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©2017 by Northern Illawarra Veterinary Hospital. Proudly servicing all of the Northern Illawarra including Fairy Meadow, Balgownie, Tarrawanna, Towradgi, Corrimal, Fernhill, Russell Vale, Bellambi, Woonona, Bulli, Thirroul, Austinmer, Coledale, Wombarra, Coal Cliff, Clifton to Stanwell Park. 

  • Jenny O'Donnell

The Year Of Living Dangerously!

Tst summer season we have been presented with an unusually large number of Grey Headed Flying Foxes by our dedicated local WIRES carers. They are a fascinating large bat species located in the forested areas of south-eastern Australia. Sadly most of them are presented due to severe injury, malnutrition or dehydration and many are already too injured or weak to respond to treatment. Sometimes however, there is a chance for survival and we assist the WIRES carers with treatment and advice so they can rehabilitate them.

This st summer season we have been presented with an unusually large number of Grey Headed Flying Foxes by our dedicated local WIRES carers. They are a fascinating large bat species located in the forested areas of south-eastern Australia. Sadly most of them are presented due to severe injury, malnutrition or dehydration and many are already too injured or weak to respond to treatment. Sometimes however, there is a chance for survival and we assist the WIRES carers with treatment and advice so they can rehabilitate them.

We think the increased numbers this summer season is due to the bats having established a local summer camp in the lower escarpment in Thirroul. The extreme heat, drought and fires have reduced their range to less affected regions such as ours. We have had reports of many deaths due to extreme heat this summer, that has also produced many orphans brought into care. We are lucky to have both WIRES and Wildlife Rescue South Coast in our region stepping up to rescue and rehabilitate as many as they can.

The Grey Headed Flying Fox is considered vulnerable to extinction due to threats such as habitat loss, mass die off during heat waves and human activity such as inappropriate fruit tree netting, electrocution on transmission lines and barbed wire entanglement.

If you have fruit trees you want to protect, please look for wildlife safe netting that has holes less than 5 mm wide. If you can poke your finger through, the holes are too big. For more information contact www.wildlifefriendlyfencing.com

In this last week we have had another net entangled bat here for treatment and she is battling with extensive wing wounds that she may not survive (see pictured extensive damage to the wing tip digits and nails). On a positive note we had some success with a juvenile orphan (pictured in his bat wrap) in care and now thriving. And the recent rains have eliminated the fires, have brought on new growth bringing nectar and fruit to our native forests, hopefully putting an end to the year of living dangerously.




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